ID: PEL_MOR

TitleMorant History of Essex 1768 - Peldon
AbstractPhilip Morant's The History and Antiquities of Essex 1768
Peldon

Lies west of Langenhoo. The name is otherwise written in records Peltendune, Pellingdon, Petindone, Peltyngdon, and Poltendon; dun, signifies a hill, which is the situation of part of this parish, especially about the church. As for the former part of the name, I do not know from whence it is derived.

In Edward the Confessor's reign, Turchill, a freeman, and another freeman, were possessed of the lands in this parish. At the time of the survey, William the Deacon held one part, and Suene, and his under-tenant, Odo, the other part.

They were divided afterwards into two Maners.
1. The maner of Peldon-hall. 2. The maner of the Rectory.

The Maner of PELDON

Peldon-hall, the mansion-house, stands on the north side of the Church.

This estate was granted by William the Conqueror to William the Deacon, about the year 1086, towards rebuilding the Cathedral Church of St. Paul, which had been newly destroyed by fire. Hence this maner came to be holden of the Bishops of London.

It was so by a Family surnamed from it de Peltindone. In 1282 Walter de Peltindone enfeoffed John de Nevyll, and Margery, his wife, in this maner, viz. in one messuage, 360 acres of arable, and one wind-mill, which he held of the Bishop of London, by the service of one knight's fee. And, in 1332, John de Langwoode did by fine release his interest in this maner of Peltyngdon, with the Advowson of the Church, to - Hugh de Nevill - John Nevill, of Essex, who dyed 25 July 1558, held for his life, and the life of his wife Alice, this maner of Peltyngdon, with the Advowson of the Church, of the Bishop of London, by the service of half a knight's fee: remainder to William de Bohun, Earl of Northampton, and his heirs. Alice presented to this Church in 1384 and 1390, and dyed in 1394.

Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, and Lord Chancellor of England was possessed of this maner and that of Langham: But being forced to quit the realm, for being reputed one of K. Richard the second's evil counsellors, his estates became forfeited. His son, Michael de la Pole, and Catharine his wife, daughter of Hugh Earl of Stafford, petitioned for a restitution of these maners in 1389. But it doth not appear they recovered this.

Some time after it was in the ancient Family of Teye, particularly mentioned in the other volume, p 202.

Robert Teye, who dyed in 1426, held the maner of Peldon or Peltyngdon, and the Advowson of the Church, of the Bishop of London, by fealty, and rent of 4s per ann. And 4 acres which made up the croft called Seven acre: And the maner of Newhall, of the said Bishop. - John, his eldest son and heir, held also the same, at the time of his decease in 1441. As did his son and successor - John Teye, Esq; who departed this life in 1462, leaving - Henry, his son, born in 1455, afterwards knighted, and Sheriff of this County in 1488, and 1500. He held this maner, and Advowson, of the Bishop of London, by fealty, and yearly rent of of 6s 8d. By Margaret his wife, daughter and coheir of John Grene of Gosfield, which dyed 24 September 1520, he had Thomas, born in 1483; William and John: Departing this life 9 September 1510, he was succeeded by his eldest son - Thomas - who was knighted; and at the time of his decease, 31 December 1540, left four daughters coheirs; namely, Margaret, wife of Sir John Jermye; Elizabeth, wife of Marmaduke Nevill, third son of Richard Nevill, Lord Latimer; Mary, wife of Sir Thomas Nevill, brother of Marmaduke; and Frances, married first to William Bonham Esq; next to Edward Bocking; and lastly to Thomas Bonham. Upon the partition of Teye's estates, this fell to the share of Bonham. But by what means we cannot discover, it came to the Crown. For, K Henry VIII, 2 September 1545, granted it to

Sir William Petre, Kt. and Anne his wife, and his heirs. The 18th of December following, they exchanged it with the King, being then valued at 34 l[ibre] a year for the maner of Cherstowe in Devonshire, and the Parsonage of Ging Mountney in this county. K. Edward VI. 4 April 1551, granted this maner, and the advowson of the Church, to

Sir Thomas Darcy, Kt. afterwards created Lord Darcy, and to the heirs male of his body. He died possessed of it 28 June 1558, as did his son - John Lord Darcy, 3 March 1580 - Thomas Lord Darcy, son of the last, was created, 5 July 1621, Viscount Colchester, and 14 November 1626, Earl Rivers. He dyed 21 February 1639. A son of his, named Thomas, was dead before him without issue; to that his four daughters, Elizabeth, Mary, Penelope, and Susan, divided his great estates. [For a more particular account of this Family, see under St Osith.]

Elizabeth, the eldest daughter, was married to Sir Thomas Savage, Kt. who dyed 20 November 1635. Her father Earl Rivers, by his will dated 14 March 1636-7, appointed her his executrix. The 26th of October 1647, she settled this estate in trustees, viz. Richard Viscount Lumley, Henry Nevill of Cressing-Temple, and Isaac Crème, Gent. in order to have it sold. Accordingly it was purchased by

Mr Thomas Reynolds, who kept his first court here 10 September 1650. He was born near Ipswich in Suffolk, of good parentage, and settling in Colchester became an eminent clothier, by which he accumulated a considerable estate. He built the large brick house without East-gate, now belonging to John-Blatch Whaley Esq; and was Mayor of Colchester in 1662. By Margery, his wife. daughter of Samuel Decoster, of London, merchant who dyed 15 April 1649, he had four sons and four daughters. He himself departed this life 29 April 1665, aged 61 years, and was buried in the south aisle of St.James's Church in Colchester, where a monument is erected to his memory. - Samuel Reynolds Esq; his eldest son and heir, was chosen one of the Burgesses in Parliament for Colchester in 1681, and 1688. He married Judith, daughter of Thomas Samford of Colchester Esq; by whom he had Samuel, George, Thomas, John; Judith and Susan. And dying 23 August 1694, aged 52 years, was buried near his father, under a black marble grave-stone, with an epitaph. - Susan, the youngest daughter, was married first, to Mr. George Jolland; afterwards to the Rev.Francis Powell. She dyed in 1750, having had by her second husband, William-Samuel Powell; William; and Susan - Samuel Reynolds Esq; eldest son and heir of Samuel, who dyed in 1694, married Frances daughter of Charles Pelham, of Brocklesby in Lincolnshire Esq; a branch of the noble family of Pelham Duke of Newcastle, and had by her, Samuel who dyed several years ago without issue, and - Charles: The latter married ... daughter of ... Anderson esq; and had a son and a daughter, who both dyed young. He himself departed this life in 1760, and by will left this, and other estates at Little Bentley &c, to his kinsman,

The Rev. William-Samuel Powell, D.D.Arch-deacon of Colchester, and Master of St. John's-College in Cambridge.

THE RECTORY is also a Maner, and had 30 acres belonging to it at the time of the Survey. It keeps a court, and hath some quit-rents. Out of it is paid a pension of three pounds a year by the Rector to the Crown.

Thomas Tey, of Layer Marney Esq; who died 20 April 1543, held lands and tenements called Newports, in Peldon; and a capital messuage called Samptons Wyke in Peldon and Sampton; and all those lands, tenements &c. belonging to the said capital messuage and the Wyke; and closes called Abbotts nine acres, Abbotts twenty acres, Abbotts seven acres, and Abbotts four acres called Woodcroft, in Peldon and Sampton, with appertenances, formerly belongiong to the Abbey of St. Osith: and another messuage with a croft adjoyning called Poysecroft, alias Tye-house field, in Peldon, with commonage in the West streete: and two crofts here called Stonerock, and Brakefeild, late Thomas Morrant's, of Great Wigborowe: also a messuage and lands called Nevards, in Leyr de la Hay, and Bretton, and Great Birch; all which he held of William Bonham Esq; and Frances his wife, as of their maner of Peldon.

Mrs. Great; Mr. William Mendham; John Ward; Thomas Green; John Wayland; John Eley; Samuel Bullock, &c have also some lands in this parish.

THE CHURCH, dedicated to the Virgin Mary, is of one pace with the Chancel, tiled. In a Tower of stone there is 1 Bell.

It appears by Domesday-book, here was a Church at the time of the Survey, but whether it be the same as is now standing, is quite uncertain.

This Rectory was many years appendent to the Maner, But was alienated from it by Samuel Reynolds Esq; and hath since passed through several hands.

This parish is rated to the land-tax at 894 l[ibre]

Alexander Vievar, L.L.B 11 June 1725, upon Ashwell's d[eath].       * G. Brook, Gent.
Hon. Edward Townshend 5 June 1744, upon Vievar's d.R. Hon. Earl of Orford.
John Wyatt, M.A. 6 May 1746 upon Townshend's cess.[ation]}
Thomas How, 17 March 1749-50 upon Wyatt's d.}
Richard Harvey, B.A. 27 April 1756, upon How's d.}   Mrs. Day.
Samuel Herring, M.A. upon Harvey's resig[nation]}
Harry Hankey, M.A. 6 March 1761, upon Herring's d.}

* [those who 'presented' all the incumbents]

Morant gives extensive quotes and references to his sources, not transcribed here. Copies of The History and Antiquities of Essex are available at the Essex Records Office and the Local Studies room at Colchester Library

Transcribed by Elaine Barker from the 1816 reprint of the book loaned by Adrian Richardson. Pages 417 to 419. See MTE for details of this copy.

KeywordsMTE, Langenhoe, st osyth, layer de la haye, Layer Breton, Great Wigborough
Published1768
SourceMersea Museum
IDPEL_MOR