ID DJG_OTY Article from Mersea Museum

TitleOld Time Yachts and Yachtsmen
AbstractWith the advent of Spring, longer days and occasional bursts of sunshine, the quaysides and hards will soon be hives of activity, with an influx at weekends of many small boat owners and their friends all making feverish attempts to remove the ravages of last season, and the winter weather, from their craft preparatory to getting afloat by Easter or soon after. Many of the more dedicated removed a great deal of their portable gear to their homes at the end of last season, so they could work on the items during the winter months. Without doubt the wives and mothers will be very pleased to see the removal of the gear from the spare room, shed or attic in order that they can get busy with their more important task of spring cleaning.

All this weekend activity in and around the yacht yards, creeks and hards, brings back memories of fifty to sixty years ago, when amateur yachtsmen were regarded as somewhat eccentric, and the large yachts and their professional crews dominated the scene. Where there are now some forty odd small craft, etc., there would be at least twenty large yachts, ranging from 15 to 300 tons in the mud berths at Woodrolfe, Tollesbury, with an equal number on chocks in Drake Bros' Yacht Yard.

It is not known when the business of yachts and yachting became a secondary industry to fishing in this locality, but dates of the formation of yacht clubs givs some indication when yachting became a "gentleman's sport" and at the turn of the century the "sport of Kings". For although King Charles II commenced yachting in 1660, it was not until 1720 that the first yacht club was formed, and that was in Ireland. The Royal Thames Yacht Club was established in 1775 and the Royal Yacht Squadron in 1815. From thence onwards with the growing popularity of the sport, yacht clubs were being formed around the whole of the coast. The Deben Yacht Club was brought into being in 1838, the Royal Harwich Yacht Club was formed in 1843, the Royal Corinthian in 1872 and the Essex Yacht Club in 1890. The pattern was similar throughout the south-coast. The yachts were traditional straight stemmed craft, with overhaning counter sterns, long bowsprits, fidded topmasts and in general very heavy spars, sails and rigging. It is fairly safe to assume that these craft presented no great difficulty to experienced fishermen, and as our fishing smacks went as far as Cornwall, Wales and Ireland in search of fish and oysters, they would at one time or another have come into contact with yachts of that era.

It is difficult to establish when the first man was employed on a yacht in this area, but undoubtedly Colneside could lay first claim to this. There is a clue, however, in the knowledge that one Captain Jeremiah Easter, who had served under Sir Arthur Wellesley (Duke of Wellington) in the Peninsular War 1809-11, lived in Tollesbury subsequent to the campaign, and without doubt was a fellow officer of Lord Uxbridge (Marquess of Anglesey) who did so much to promote yacht racing, and had a particular affinity to Rowhedge, was intrumental in persuading Tollesbury men to undertake yacht racing. We know that in later years Tollesbury men often walked to Fingringhoe and Rowhedge to join yachts berthed at Wivenhoe and Brightlingsea. The majority of the elder fishermen served at one time or another on one of the more famous racing yachts. Tollesbury men served in all but one of the America cup contenders, and quite a number rose to command some of the finest yachts ever built.

In the mid 19th century, schooling wa practically non-existent, and the only way to gain some rudimentary knowledge of the three R's was to enroll at one or other of the two Church schools at 2d per week. Children invariably left school at 12 years of age and commenced work, and it was only by means of hard study in leisure time, that they were able to educate themselves for better positions. A number of the yachtsmen went home trade coasting and foreign-going in deep sea ships, in winter time, and qualified for Board of Trade certificates of competency. Two of the more successful yachtmasters at the turn of the century, Captain William Frost and Isaac Rice voluntarily took pupils during the winter months and taught them the rudiments of navigation. Capt. Isaac Rice by arrangement with Mr Joseph Jackson then schoolmaster at Tollesbury, instructed some of the older boys at school, and on suitable days at 12 noon they "shot the sun" with sextants, using a bath filled with water as an "artificial horizon". In those days, Tollesbury school was very much alive to the needs of boys intending to make the sea as their career. Knitting and darning classes were regularly held, and for older boys there were "cookery classes." Any boy could get a good grounding in seamanship by watching the fishermen at their shore tasks of rope splicing, net making and sail repairing, and there were always a number of rowboats available at the Hard for practice in rowing and sculling over the sterns.

One of the most notable yachtmasters at the end of the last century, and still remembered as a founder member and vice- chairman of hte parish council, was Capt. Alfred Carter. Born in 1837, he was for over 40 years master of the racing yawl "Hyacinth" 90 tons, owned by Capt. Garth R.N. Capt. Carter was very proud of the fact that he had beaten the German Emperor on his home ground, by winning his cup at Kiel Regatta.

Prior to the outbreak of the Great War 1914, quite a number of Colneside and Tollesbury men served in German yachts, notably the "Meteors" owned by the Kaiser and "Suzanne" owned by Herr O. Huldschinsky. In 1909 owing to German public opinion, the number of Essex men recruited was reducced, and only a few men in key positions were serving on the German yachts in August 1914. Fears for their safety were widespread in these parts, but apparently the Kaiser issued strict orders for their safe conduct back to these shores, and within a matter of weeks they were serving in the Royal Navy. One who served in the Dover Patrol was Mr Frank Bowles who was chef in the "Meteor", and he recounted at that time the Kaiser's liking for dressed crab and lobster mayonnaise. It can be imagined that the Kaiser had explicit faith in the Essex members of his crew, but little could be foreseen at the time of ultimate events, otherwise there could have been more retaliation, knowing Essex men as we do.

One of the more colourful yacht skippers here at the turn of the century was Capt. Alred Redgewell, affectionately known as "Uncle Billy" by all and sundry in the village. For many years he was employed by Messrs Albert and William Brooks as master of their various yachts including the large yawl "Wanderer". He was held in high esteem by his employers, who regarded him as a friend and treated him accordingly. The majority of yacht owners were kind considerate gentlemen, very oftenmost generous to their skippers and crews. The only qualitiies they expected apart from professional efficiency being loyalty and integrity. The number of houses bearing old-time yacht names bear testimony to the number of yacht owners who were well satisified with employees who had rendered good service. Apart fromowning a home of one's own, one of the status symbols of the more successful yacht skipper was to have a pony and trap. Capt. Redgewell was different, he had a donkey and cart. The tale is that he asked on of his children what was required as a present, and the child replied "A donkey" meaning a toy one. The redoubtable "Billy" it is said brought the donkey home to Tollesbury on the deck of the yacht.

A yacht which attracted quite a deal of interest at the beginning of the century was the "Sonya" designed and built in 1904 by Nathaniel Herreshoff at Rhode Island, U.S.A., for Mrs Farley Turner. The yacht was brought to London Docks on the deck of the s.s. "Minnetonka", and William James Drake, son of the founder of Drake Brothers Yachtbuilders was specially asked by the American lady owner to superintend the unloading of the yacht. The steel wire slings, eyes and shackles, supplied for loading and unloading the yacht, were formerly part of the rigging of the America cup defender "Columbia" (1899-1902). It says a good deal for the quality of the gear at that time, for up to a few years ago, the slings, etc., were still in good condition although exposed to the weather at Drake's Shipyard. The cutter yacht "Sonya" 42 tons was skippered by Capt. Frederick Stokes of Tollesbury, who subsequently had charge of "Mariquita" 100 tons, and towards the end of his yachting career, the three masted schooner-ketch "Radiant" 290 tons, formerly "Xarifa". Capt. Stokes was then residing in Southampton, where quite a number of Colneside and Tollesbury yacht masters settled down.

Another successful racing skipper was Capt. Steve Barbrook. In 1908 he had charge of Sir James Pender's 23 metre yacht "Brynhild" 174 tons. Heavily sparred and rigged, the yacht did not do so well that year, and it was decided to re-rig her with a more fair weather rig for season 1909. When leading the racing off Southend in May of that year, the mast snapped off at the keelson and drove down through the hull of the yacht. "Brynhild" sunk within six minutes, and the 22 man crew and 6 guests were rescued by "Shamrock"and "White Heather" which were also taking part in the race from Harwich to Southend. In 1911, Capt. Barbrook was skipper of the 19 metre "Corona" owned by Mr Almeric Paget (later Lord Queenborough) and Mr Richard Hennessey, and had much better luck. For a period up to the 1914 War, Capt. Barbrook was sailing master to H.M. King Alfonso of Spain in the 15 metre "Hispania". King Alfonso evidently had a high regard for Capt. Barbrook and his family, for he was succeeded in later years by his nephews Arthur and Alfred Barbrook.

One of the most successful racing yachts prior to 1914 was the cutter "Creole" 54 tons, built by Forrest of Wivenhoe in 1890 for Colonel Villiers Bagot. During 23 years of racing, she made 569 starts and won 339 races as follows :- 1st 166 ; 2nd 132 ; 3rd 38; and 4th 3 times. The cups and trophies won presented a most impressive array. During the whole of "Creole's" racing career she was skippered by Capt. Charles Leavett who also had a crew from Tollesbury. Capt. Leavett was held in very high esteem in yacht racing circles, and always insisted on well set sails and good sailing trim. The sails of "Creole" were made by Gowen and Company, then of Tollesbury, whose founder Mr A.A. Gowen, had been sailmaker in the tea clipper "Cutty Sark". In an issue of "The Field" on 1913, there appeared the following write-up, which had to be learned by heart by the then sailmakers and apprentices of Messrs. Gowen :-
    "Of the handicap yachts there was a fair fleet, and Col. Bagot's old Creole appeared smart and trim with a very nice fitting new mainsail, which somebody said was made by the Sailmaker at Tollesbury. If this is the case it would seem that racing canvas can be obtained from other places beside Gosport, Cowes and Gourock."
Much to the chagrin and disgust of Capt. Leavett, the mainsail was badly stained on one occasion by a gunpowder wad fired from a starting gun at The Castle, Cowes, and despite all efforts the dirty black smudge was never eradicated.

In 1921 (?), H.M. King George V asked Col. Bagot for the services of Capt. Leavett as sailing master for his cutter "Britannia". Unfortunately there was a clash of personalities between Major Sir Philip Hunloke, the King's helmsman and Capt. Leavett, who had had vast racing experience since the days when he served in "Valkyrie", and like all good racing skippers thought ahead and anticipated racing tactics, changes of sail, etc. However, in spite of their differences, "Britannia" had a most successful racing season. Capt. Leavett's racing days were however not finished, for in 1924 owing to the illness of the regular skipper, his services were sought by Sir Thomas Lipton for his 23 metre cutter "Shamrock". The cutter under his command had a most successful racing season, which unfortunately was sadly marred by the tragic loss of the mate, Theodore Lewis of Tollesbury, in August that year whilst racing in the Solent.

In 1928, Col. Bagot had an accident at his home and died. By the terms of his will, "Creole" which had been laid up at Brightlingsea since 1914, was to be broken up and his trophies to be distributed, many to the original yacht clubs which had donated them.

Other local men specialised in the command of large cruising craft such as Capt. William Fost, who owned a thriving barge and coal merchant's business, but was for many years master of Colonel Bibby's schooner yachts "Morning Star" and "Tamesis". Prior to this he had been master of the steam yacht "Grace Darling" 169 tons, and at the beginning of this century, the largest yacht to have entered and berthed at Woodrolfe. One of the unique features of this yacht was that although constructed in 1887, she possessed a fresh-water distilling apparatus.

Capt. Zachariah Lewis had the charge of the large steam yacht "Samaritan" and schooner "Vera" owned by Mr A. Solomons. "Samaritan" straight stemmed and painted black, with a great deal of gilt gingerbread around the stem and counter, was too large to enter Woodrolfe Creek, owning to her draft, and had to berth down at "The Whale". "Samaritan" was sold to the Turkish Navy for use as a gunboat prior to the 1914 War. Capt. Isaac Rice, senior, was for many years master of the steam yacht "Winifred" owned by Major Hilder. Like most local yachtmasters he preferred to have local men as crew, and he was fortunate in this respect always having a full complement including his chief engineer, Mr Arthur Allen. "Winifred" was a familiar and splendid sight each winter in her berth at Woodrolfe, until early in 1915 when she was taken away by a French naval crew for duty as a hospital ship. For a time after Great War I, Capt. Rice was in command of the smaller steam yacht "Bantam". In 1923 he was badly crushed and injured when he went to the rescue of a crew member who had fallen from a boarding ladder between the yacht and quay wall. 1926 when in charge of the steam yacht "Medea", he tragically lost his life when swept off the bridge in heavy seas off Sardinia. He had been on the bridge for over 36 hours.

In spite of the precarious nature of the employment, for very few men apart from skippers, mates, etc., received pay or retainers during the period of yacht lay-ups, there were never any men lacking for crews. Wages were always good in comparison with shore standards. In 1914, men received 26/- basic per week. Special duties men received extras, e.g. Bowspritmen 2/6 per day, Mastheadmen 5/-, for these were the days of jackyard topsails and gaff mainsails. In addition there was the prize money, £1 per man for 1st prize, 15/- for 2nd prize, and subsistance allowance 2/6d per day when racing, as it was not possible to cook or prepare meals when racing. Whether win or lose, there was starting money of 10/- per race. Apart from the monetary gains there were also what could be termed fringe benefits today. Principally they were the articles of clothing, supplied each year by the yacht owner, and which became the employee's property by the time honoured custom after completing a season's service.

The number of professional yachtsmen in regular employment now in this area could be counted on two hands, but effort is being made to encourage the return of yachts for mooring, berthing and slipping facilities in this locality. Let us hope that within a short space of time this venture will meet with success, and that Woodrolfe, Tollesbury, will regain some of its old time glory and provide additional employment and trade for the village as a whole.

The typewritten article from Douglas Gurton is dated 10.3.70 and concludes with a photograph caption below. The exact photograph with the young lady standing on the bulwark has not been found yet, but the photograph below is thought to be from the same set.

Owners, Guests and Crew on board yawl "Wanderer" circa 1887. The trendy dressed young lady standing on bulwark holding gun "Annie Oakley" style is surprisingly dressed similar to current young ladies' fashions - sombrero hat maxi coat, trousers and knee length boots.

(Photo loaned by Mr Charles Wash, aged 87 years, whose father was the cook depicted in each photograph. Mr Wash informed me that his father died when he himself was aged 4 years, which would place the date of the photographs in excess of 83 years circa 1887).

AuthorDouglas Jack Gurton
SourceMersea Museum / Cedric Gurton
IDDJG_OTY
Related Images:
 The hulk of the 23 metre racing cutter BRYNHILD, beached in Brightlingsea creek for breaking up, after her dramatic sinking at Harwich in 1910.
 Used in The Northseamen page 175.
 Used in The Big Class Racing Yachts page 94.  BOXB2_400_051
ImageID:   BOXB2_400_051
Title: The hulk of the 23 metre racing cutter BRYNHILD, beached in Brightlingsea creek for breaking up, after her dramatic sinking at Harwich in 1910.
Used in The Northseamen page 175.
Used in The Big Class Racing Yachts page 94.
Date:1910
Source:John Leather Collection
 METEOR IV, designed and built in Germany 1909.
 Used in The Big Class Racing Yachts page 97.  BOXB2_400_053
ImageID:   BOXB2_400_053
Title: METEOR IV, designed and built in Germany 1909.
Used in The Big Class Racing Yachts page 97.
Source:John Leather Collection
 Schooner TAMESIS. The old steamer and sailing ship type of ornamental bow for many years before 1936 seen sailing on the River Colne. [DW].
 The 140 ton schooner yacht TAMESIS weighing anchor in the Colne, 1933. The cable is being hove short and the staysail is backed to stop her forging ahead in the light breeze under the foresail (the sail between the masts in a two masted gaff rigged schooner) and a small jib. The mainsail hangs in lifts awaiting final adjustments to its halyards and clew outhaul. The boat in davits on her quarter will also be swigged up and griped in when she bears away out of the river.
 Schooner yachts of this size were becoming rare by the 1930s. The 107ft, clipper bowed TAMESIS was designed and built at Cowes, Isle of Wight, by C. Hansen and Sons in 1875. Auxiliary petrol engines were installed in 1928 which reduced her speed under sail but made her more manageable in confined harbours such as Ramsgate or Torquay, with few hands. When this photograph was taken in the early 1930s she was owned by Alfred Adams and sailed with a principally Brightlingsea crew. The clipper bow, prominent shroud channels, and topmasts give a robust appearance to this old cruising yacht, which survived laid-up in a Brightlingsea mud berth until the late 1940s.
 The masthead stays of this version of schooner rig complicate the setting of a main topsail between the masts; effective on a reach yet difficult to pass over the stays when tacking.
 The steam yacht beyond her is probably the 110ft MEDEA, then owned by John Wild, a leading shareholder in the Brightlingsea shipyard of Aldous Successors Ltd. The MEDEA is now preserved at San Diego, California.
 Again, Went has achieved a well balanced composition from the anchored steam yacht, through the stirring schooner to the jutting bow of the motor cruiser in the foreground. [JL]
 Plate.24 in SWW.
 Used in The Sailor's Coast, page 58.
 Used in Essex Countryside December 1963 page 87.
 TAMESIS 71881 owner J.R. Hoare registered Cowes [LRY 1881]
 TAMESIS 71881 owner Col. Alfred Bibby [LRY 1900]
 TAMESIS 71881 owner Col. Alfred Bibby [LRY 1914]
 TAMESIS Official No. 71881, owner Alfred C. Adams [Lloyds Yacht Register 1935].
 TAMESIS 71881 Aux twin screw schooner, 2 petrol motors, owner J.L. Wild registered Cowes [LRY 1947]
 TAMESIS 71881 owner J.L. Wild [LRY 1953]. Not in 1969 LRY.
 The Salty Shore, page 130, mentions TAMESIS in the late 1950s serving out her days as a houseboat in the Tollesbury saltings.  BOXB5_013_012
ImageID:   BOXB5_013_012
Title: Schooner TAMESIS. The old steamer and sailing ship type of ornamental bow for many years before 1936 seen sailing on the River Colne. [DW].
The 140 ton schooner yacht TAMESIS weighing anchor in the Colne, 1933. The cable is being hove short and the staysail is backed to stop her forging ahead in the light breeze under the foresail (the sail between the masts in a two masted gaff rigged schooner) and a small jib. The mainsail hangs in lifts awaiting final adjustments to its halyards and clew outhaul. The boat in davits on her quarter will also be swigged up and griped in when she bears away out of the river.
Schooner yachts of this size were becoming rare by the 1930s. The 107ft, clipper bowed TAMESIS was designed and built at Cowes, Isle of Wight, by C. Hansen and Sons in 1875. Auxiliary petrol engines were installed in 1928 which reduced her speed under sail but made her more manageable in confined harbours such as Ramsgate or Torquay, with few hands. When this photograph was taken in the early 1930s she was owned by Alfred Adams and sailed with a principally Brightlingsea crew. The clipper bow, prominent shroud channels, and topmasts give a robust appearance to this old cruising yacht, which survived laid-up in a Brightlingsea mud berth until the late 1940s.
The masthead stays of this version of schooner rig complicate the setting of a main topsail between the masts; effective on a reach yet difficult to pass over the stays when tacking.
The steam yacht beyond her is probably the 110ft MEDEA, then owned by John Wild, a leading shareholder in the Brightlingsea shipyard of Aldous Successors Ltd. The MEDEA is now preserved at San Diego, California.
Again, Went has achieved a well balanced composition from the anchored steam yacht, through the stirring schooner to the jutting bow of the motor cruiser in the foreground. [JL]
Plate.24 in SWW.
Used in The Sailor's Coast, page 58.
Used in Essex Countryside December 1963 page 87.
TAMESIS 71881 owner J.R. Hoare registered Cowes [LRY 1881]
TAMESIS 71881 owner Col. Alfred Bibby [LRY 1900]
TAMESIS 71881 owner Col. Alfred Bibby [LRY 1914]
TAMESIS Official No. 71881, owner Alfred C. Adams [Lloyds Yacht Register 1935].
TAMESIS 71881 Aux twin screw schooner, 2 petrol motors, owner J.L. Wild registered Cowes [LRY 1947]
TAMESIS 71881 owner J.L. Wild [LRY 1953]. Not in 1969 LRY.
The Salty Shore, page 130, mentions TAMESIS in the late 1950s serving out her days as a houseboat in the Tollesbury saltings.
Date:1933
Source:John Leather Collection / Douglas Went
 52 footer SONYA rustles through the Solent under her spinnaker in 1905 with Captain Fred Stokes of Tollesbury at the tiller. She was designed by the American yachtbuilding genius Nathaniel Herreshoff for Mrs Turner-Farley to race in a keenly sailed class.
 Picture used in The Salty Shore, page 110.
 See also Courier artilce COR_015.  BOXD_007_001_001
ImageID:   BOXD_007_001_001
Title: 52 footer SONYA rustles through the Solent under her spinnaker in 1905 with Captain Fred Stokes of Tollesbury at the tiller. She was designed by the American yachtbuilding genius Nathaniel Herreshoff for Mrs Turner-Farley to race in a keenly sailed class.
Picture used in The Salty Shore, page 110.
See also Courier artilce COR_015.
Date:1905
Source:John Leather Collection
 After guard of CREOLE 54 tons.
 1890-1913 569 starts, 339 prizes, 166 firsts, 132 seconds, 38 thirds, 3 fourths.
 L-R Captain Charles Leavett, Sam Heard Mate, Bill Gager 2nd Mate, Fred Layzell C. Steward.
 CREOLE was built 1890 Forrestt & Co. Ltd., Wivenhoe. Composite. Offical No. 98113. Scrapped Brightlingsea 1931.  CG6_035
ImageID:   CG6_035
Title: After guard of CREOLE 54 tons.
1890-1913 569 starts, 339 prizes, 166 firsts, 132 seconds, 38 thirds, 3 fourths.
L-R Captain Charles Leavett, Sam Heard Mate, Bill Gager 2nd Mate, Fred Layzell C. Steward.
CREOLE was built 1890 Forrestt & Co. Ltd., Wivenhoe. Composite. Offical No. 98113. Scrapped Brightlingsea 1931.
Source:Mersea Museum / Cedric Gurton Collection
 Owners and Crew of yawl yacht WANDERER.
 Owners: Messrs. Albert & William Brooks
 Skipper: Alfred Redgewell of Tollesbury
</p>
<p>Douglas Gurton says of a similar photograph:
loaned by Mr Charles Wash, aged 87 years in 1970, whose
father was the cook depicted in the photograph.
Mr Wash informed me that his father died when he himself
was aged 4 years, which would place the date of the photographs
in excess of 83 years circa 1887).
</p>  CG6_205
ImageID:   CG6_205
Title: Owners and Crew of yawl yacht WANDERER.
Owners: Messrs. Albert & William Brooks
Skipper: Alfred Redgewell of Tollesbury

Douglas Gurton says of a similar photograph: loaned by Mr Charles Wash, aged 87 years in 1970, whose father was the cook depicted in the photograph. Mr Wash informed me that his father died when he himself was aged 4 years, which would place the date of the photographs in excess of 83 years circa 1887).

Date:c1887
Source:Mersea Museum / Cedric Gurton Collection
 Trophies won by yacht CREOLE.
 Templer 1906, K. of Belgians 1910, Templer 1906
   Ryder Town 1901
 Ryder Town 1908, Emperors 1904, Templar 1905
   London 1896, Ryder Town 1899  CG6_211
ImageID:   CG6_211
Title: Trophies won by yacht CREOLE.
Templer 1906, K. of Belgians 1910, Templer 1906
  Ryder Town 1901
Ryder Town 1908, Emperors 1904, Templar 1905
  London 1896, Ryder Town 1899
Date:c1910
Source:Mersea Museum / Cedric Gurton Collection
 Trophies won by the yacht CREOLE.
 Templer 1907, Emperors 2nd 1906, French President 1903
 Southern 1900, 2. of Belgians 1910, Queens Cup 1900, Coronation 1902  CG6_221
ImageID:   CG6_221
Title: Trophies won by the yacht CREOLE.
Templer 1907, Emperors 2nd 1906, French President 1903
Southern 1900, 2. of Belgians 1910, Queens Cup 1900, Coronation 1902
Date:c1910
Source:Mersea Museum / Cedric Gurton Collection
 Tropies won by yacht CREOLE.
 Top Southampton 1893, Weymouth T... 1910, St. Georges 1894.
 Bottom 1. Thames 1904, Victoria 1904, Whittaker Wright 1900, Albert Cup 1901.
 Bottom 2. Antwerp Challenger 1894-5, Lord Warden 1910.
 Bottom 3. Victoria 1906, Niadhook ? 1891, Emperor 3rd 1907, Paget 1910.  CG6_231
ImageID:   CG6_231
Title: Tropies won by yacht CREOLE.
Top Southampton 1893, Weymouth T... 1910, St. Georges 1894.
Bottom 1. Thames 1904, Victoria 1904, Whittaker Wright 1900, Albert Cup 1901.
Bottom 2. Antwerp Challenger 1894-5, Lord Warden 1910.
Bottom 3. Victoria 1906, Niadhook ? 1891, Emperor 3rd 1907, Paget 1910.
Date:c1910
Source:Mersea Museum / Cedric Gurton Collection
 Cutter CREOLE 54 tons. Built by Forrestt & Son Wivenhoe in 1890.
 Skipper Charles Leavett. 
 Crew: W. Gager, G. Rice, E. Burrows, S. Heard, C. Leavett, E. Pearce, Col. W.S. Bagot.  CG6_253
ImageID:   CG6_253
Title: Cutter CREOLE 54 tons. Built by Forrestt & Son Wivenhoe in 1890.
Skipper Charles Leavett.
Crew: W. Gager, G. Rice, E. Burrows, S. Heard, C. Leavett, E. Pearce, Col. W.S. Bagot.
Source:Mersea Museum / Cedric Gurton Collection
 VERA  CG6_255
ImageID:   CG6_255
Title: VERA
Source:Mersea Museum / Cedric Gurton Collection
 H.M. Yacht BRITANNIA. 
 H.M. King Georve V, H.M. Queen Mary, H.R.H. Prince Albert(Duke of York), H.R.H. Princess Mary.
 Major Philip Hunloke, Helmsman, Captain Charles Leavett, Sailing Master.
 A large photograph, copied from one taken by Captain Sydney C. Leavett.  CG6_281
ImageID:   CG6_281
Title: H.M. Yacht BRITANNIA.
H.M. King Georve V, H.M. Queen Mary, H.R.H. Prince Albert(Duke of York), H.R.H. Princess Mary.
Major Philip Hunloke, Helmsman, Captain Charles Leavett, Sailing Master.
A large photograph, copied from one taken by Captain Sydney C. Leavett.
Date:c1920
Source:Mersea Museum / Cedric Gurton Collection
 Steam yacht WINIFRED. 3rd right Isaac Rice (snr) from Tollesbury ?
 Tollesbury to the year 2000, page 61, says Capt Isaac Rice was master of the steam yacht WINIFRED owned by Major Hilder.  DWS_031
ImageID:   DWS_031
Title: Steam yacht WINIFRED. 3rd right Isaac Rice (snr) from Tollesbury ?
Tollesbury to the year 2000, page 61, says "Capt Isaac Rice was master of the steam yacht WINIFRED owned by Major Hilder."
Date:Before 1914
Source:Mersea Museum / Derek Shakespeare


This item is part of the Mersea Island Museum Collection. The contents must not be published without the permission of the Museum. The information is accurate as far as is known, but the Museum does not accept responsibility for errors.


Copyright Mersea Island Museum Trust 2017